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PAST IACB NEWS


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Indian Arts and Crafts Board To Host Juried Youth Art and Craft Exhibitions


December 6, 2013

The Indian Arts and Crafts Board will host a juried art and craft competition for Indian youth at each of its three regional museums in the spring of 2014. The theme of the competitions will be "Where do we come from? Where are we going?"

The competitions will be open to enrolled members of federally recognized Tribes between the ages of 13 and 18. Official written documentation to verify the youth's enrollment in a federally recognized Tribe and written parental or guardian permission will be required.

The competitions will provide Indian youth with a realistic juried art show experience; encourage the development and expansion of their production and marketing skills; and enhance youth interest in culture, history, and the possibility of an artistic career. All submissions of work will be judged by an independent jury of artists, artisans, and art professionals. Awards will be distributed in the amount of $100 for each first place, $75 for each second place, and $50 for each third place.

The three museums operated by the IACB: the Sioux Indian Museum, Rapid City, SD; the Southern Plains Indian Museum, Anadarko, OK; and the Museum of the Plains Indian, Browning, MT; will serve as venues for the exhibition of a limited selection of submitted works.

In addition, the IACB will feature the selected works in promotional brochures to complement the exhibitions. Each work awarded first place will also be featured on an IACB museum poster, the IACB website, and in IACB promotional and educational materials.

All artwork must be submitted by March 1, 2014. Winners will be announced in April 2014. Exhibitions of selected works will be held at each of the IACB museums from April 15-May 31, 2014.

FOR MORE INFORMATION, INCLUDING OFFICIAL CONTEST RULES AND PROCEDURES, PLEASE CONTACT: Conor McMahon, Chief Curator, Indian Arts and Crafts Board, 605-394-2381


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Sioux Indian Museum To feature Charles Her Many Horses in a Special Exhibition


November 20, 2013

RAPID CITY, SOUTH DAKOTA: The Sioux Indian Museum,administered by the Indian Arts and Crafts Board of the U.S. Department of the Interior, will feature an exhibit of paintings by Charles Her Many Horses. The exhibition will run from November 24, 2013, to January 31, 2014. On November 24, 2013, and an opening reception will be held for the artist from 2:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. The artist will be available to discuss his work during the reception. The reception and exhibit are both free and open to the public.

Charles Her Many Horses, an enrolled member of the Rosebud Sioux Tribe, is a contemporary artist who works in a variety of media, including painting, sculpture, and jewelry. Born in Rosebud, SD, Charles attended Todd County High School, in Mission, SD, before moving to Minneapolis-St. Paul, where he attended the University of Minnesota, Twin Cities. He currently lives in Rosebud, SD, where he works full time as an artist.

From childhood, Charles had a strong interest in art. Through many years of study and practice he developed his skills and techniques. He begins his artistic process by selecting the subject matter for a painting or sculpture. Inspiration for his work comes from both ancient and modern masters. Themes for his work derive from his personal experiences as well as traditional Lakota stories. If the subject is a traditional story or theme he uses characters that are geometrical and whimsical. He is always seeking to add an element of humor to each piece to intrigue contemporary audiences and attempt to dispel preconceived notions about Indian art.

Charles' artwork has been included in multiple art shows including the Red Cloud Indian Art Show, the American Indian Higher Education Consortium Art Show, and the Northern Plains Indian Art Market. He received numerous awards including the Aplan Award for outstanding young artist at the 2010 Red Cloud Indian Art Show and 1st Place in the Painting Division at the 2013 Red Cloud Indian Art Show.

The Sioux Indian Museum is managed by the U.S. Department of the Interior, Indian Arts and Crafts Board. Regular viewing hours are Monday through Saturday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., and Sunday, 12 p.m. to 5 p.m. The museum is located within the Journey Museum at 222 New York St. Rapid City, South Dakota. For more information call the museum at (605) 394-2381.


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Indian Arts and Crafts Board Telephonic Roundtable 09/26/13


September 26, 2013

As part of its ongoing efforts to broaden the role of individual Indian artists and artisans in the Indian arts and crafts market, the Indian Arts and Crafts Board (IACB) is initiating a series of telephonic roundtables to bring Indian artists and artisans of varying expertise together to share tips for success. The first of these roundtables, Internet Marketing, will occur on Thursday, September 26, 2013, at 3:00 Eastern Standard Time. Please contact the IACB at 1-888-ART-FAKE, or by email to iacb@ios.doi.gov, to receive a call in code and a package of information.

Teleconference slots are limited, and will be assigned on a first come, first served basis.


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Museum of the Plains Indian to feature Stacey Gilham Keller in a Special Exhibition


July 19, 2013

BROWNING, MT: The Museum of the Plains Indian administered by the Indian Arts and Crafts Board of the U.S. Department of the Interior, announces the opening of the exhibition Masks and Crafts by Stacey Gilham Keller on Thursday, August 1, 2013, from 2:00 p.m. to 4:30 p.m.

Stacey Gilham Keller is an enrolled member of the Blackfeet Tribe of Montana. Born in Browning, Montana, she was raised on many reservations throughout the western United States as her father pursued a career in law enforcement. She currently lives in Browning with her husband Mark.

Stacey attributes her passion for art to her parents, Dan and Jewel Gilham. Jewel was a well-known Native American clothing designer in the 1970s and later designed and crafted many home interior and seasonal items. Stacey was also inspired by her maternal grandmother, Irene Racine Salois, an artist who owned and operated a gift shop for many years in East Glacier Park, Montana, selling handmade crafts from local artists. Stacey was fascinated with the artwork at her grandmother's shop and developed a great appreciation for Native American culture and artwork as her family traveled throughout the United States and Canada.

Inspiration for Stacey's buckskin masks comes from her desire to capture expressions or convey impressions of Native Americans through different media. Each mask and art piece that she creates is an original design. All of her artwork carries her Indian paintbrush flower insignia. This flower is native to the Blackfeet reservation and Glacier National Park, and Stacey likes to bring nature into her designs to reflect the Blackfeet Tribe's culture and resources.

This exhibit is Stacey Gilham Keller's first museum exhibition.

The Museum of the Plains Indian is managed by the Indian Arts and Crafts Board, U.S. Department of the Interior. This exhibition will continue through September 30, 2013. The Museum of the Plains Indian is located at the junction of U.S. Highways 2 and 89 West in Browning, Montana. For more information, including hours of operation, contact the museum at (406) 338-2230.


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Protections for Indian Artists and Artisans Seminar


July 15, 2013

WOODVILLE, TX - The Alabama-Coushatta Tribe of Texas and the Indian Arts and Crafts Board, U.S. Department of the Interior, will host a free seminar, Promote and Protect Your Authentic Indian Art and Craftwork, on Saturday, August 17, 2013, at the Alabama-Coushatta Tribal Retreat in Woodville, Texas. The seminar will highlight the Indian Arts and Crafts Act, trademarks, copyrights, and patents, Internet marketing, and related business ideas that American Indian artists and artisans may use to promote and protect their traditional and contemporary creative works.

The seminar will serve as a platform for new marketing and promotional ideas and will provide a forum for participants to network and share their experiences as well as their art and craftwork with other Indian artists. As the misrepresentation of art and craftwork as genuine Indian products continues to have devastating effects on Tribal economies nationwide, the focus of the seminar is also to raise the visibility of the Indian Arts and Crafts Act and other laws that protect the livelihoods and cultural heritage of Indian Tribes and their members.

The seminar is free, and open to the public. It will be held:

Saturday, August 17, 2013
10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.
Alabama-Coushatta Tribal Retreat
318 US Hwy 190 West
Woodville, Texas

For additional information on this seminar, please contact the Indian Arts and Crafts Board toll-free at 1-888-ART-FAKE, or email iacb@ios.doi.gov

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The Indian Arts and Crafts Board, a federal agency under the U.S. Department of the Interior, was established by Congress in 1935. Its dual mission is to promote authentic Native American art and craftwork of members of federally recognized Tribes, as well as to implement and enforce the Indian Arts and Crafts Act, which makes it illegal to fraudulently market art and craftwork as Indian made when it is not made by and Indian as defined by the Act.

Media contacts:
Indian Arts and Crafts Board

U.S. Department of the Interior
202-208-3773

Cultural Programs Office
Alabama Coushatta Tribe
936-563-1116

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Mount Rushmore National Memorial and Sioux Indian Museum Announce Visiting Artist Program for Summer 2013


June 14, 2013

RAPID CITY, SOUTH DAKOTA - The Department of the Interior's National Park Service and Indian Arts and Crafts Board's (IACB) Sioux Indian Museum are pleased to announce a collaboration to establish a program for visiting American Indian artists and artisans. This program will allow artists and artisans who are enrolled members of federally recognized Tribes to demonstrate their skills at both Mount Rushmore National Memorial and the IACB's Sioux Indian Museum, located in The Journey Museum facility, Rapid City, South Dakota. The goal of this program is to raise the visibility of and appreciation for the art and craftwork of American Indian Tribes to large audiences at Mount Rushmore and the Sioux Indian Museum. It will also offer the opportunity for artists to reach a wide variety of potential consumers from across the nation and from other countries.

Participation in the program involves a two day commitment. During day one, artists will work at Mount Rushmore demonstrating art and craftwork for visitors. During day two of the program, artists will continue to demonstrate the creation of art and craftwork at the Sioux Indian Museum in Rapid City. While at the Sioux Indian Museum, artists will have the opportunity to sell their work through The Journey Museum Store.

For further information on how to become a participant in the program please contact:

Maureen McGee-Ballinger
Director of Interpretation and Educatiom
Mount Rushmore National Memorial
National Park Service
605-574-3115
maureen_mcGee-ballinger@nps.gov
Conor McMahon
Chief Curator
Indian Arts and Crafts Board
605-394-2381
sim@journeymuseum.org  

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About the National Park Service. More than 20,000 National Park Service employees care for America's 401 national parks and work with communities across the nation to help preserve local history and create close-to-home recreational opportunities. Learn more at www.nps.gov.

About the Indian Arts and Crafts Board. The IACB, a federal agency under the U.S. Department of the Interior, was established by Congress in 1935. Its dual mission is to promote authentic Native American art and craftwork of members of federally recognized Tribes, as well as to implement and enforce the Indian Arts and Crafts Act, which makes it illegal to fraudulently market art and craftwork as Indian made when it is not made by an Indian as defined by the Act. Learn more at www.doi.gov/iacb.


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California Man Pleads Guilty To Misrepresenting His Jewelry As Produced By An Indian Sentenced to 30 Months of Probation and Prohibited from Representing His Jewelry as Indian Produced


June 19, 2013

ALBUQUERQUE - Andrew Gene Alvarez, 60, of Wofford Heights, Calif., pleaded guilty this morning to a misdemeanor information charging him with misrepresenting that jewelry he made and offered for sale was made by an Indian. After entering his guilty plea, Alvarez was sentenced to 30 months of probation to be followed by a year of supervised release. As part of his sentence, Alvarez is prohibited from representing that any jewelry he produces is of Indian origin or Indian produced.

Alvarez was indicted in Sept. 2012, and charged with violating the Indian Arts and Crafts Act, 18 U.S.C. § 1159, by falsely representing that jewelry he made and offered for sale was produced by an Indian. According to the indictment, Alvarez made these misrepresentations in May 2011, during the Native Treasures Show at the Santa Fe Community Convention Center.

According to court filings, the FBI initiated an investigation into Alvarez in May 2010, after receiving a referral from the Indian Arts and Crafts Board (IACB) of the U.S. Department of the Interior. The IACB asserted that Alvarez was a prominent jeweler who represented himself as alternatively Mescalero, Apache, Colville and Mayo Indian and marketed his jewelry at the Santa Fe Indian Market, as well as nationally at high-profile Indian arts and crafts events. The IACB also asserted that after due inquiry, it determined that Alvarez was not an enrolled member of a recognized Native American tribe who was entitled to market his work in any manner which suggested that his work was an Indian product.

In May, 2010, Alvarez registered as an exhibitor at the Native Treasures Indian art show in Santa Fe and identified himself as "Andrew Redhorse Alvarez" and as a "Colville/Apache" Indian. During the art show, Alvarez told an FBI agent who did not identify himself as a law enforcement officer that his father was Colville and his mother was Apache. Thereafter, the FBI agent learned that Alvarez told an IACB employee that his heritage was Mescalero Apache, Colville and Mayo during the Santa Fe Indian Market in Aug. 2010.

In May 2011, an FBI agent and a National Park Service criminal investigator made an undercover purchase of jewelry from Alvarez at the Native Treasures show in Santa Fe, where the program specified Alvarez's tribal affiliation as Colville/Apache and his artistic medium as jewelry. While the officers examined Alvarez's jewelry, they engaged Alvarez in conversation about his tribal affiliation, the nature of tribal registration, his family background, the Native American jewelry business and the Indian Arts and Crafts Act. When the criminal investigator purchased three pieces of jewelry from Alvarez, Alvarez included three of his business cards on which he had written descriptions of the jewelry and his purported tribal affiliation as "Apache/Colville."

Court records reflect that Alvarez's birth certificate identifies both his parents as White with no reference to Indian blood or ancestry. Other official records reflect that Alvarez's maternal grandparents are of Mexican descent.

The Indian Arts and Crafts Act prohibits the offer or display for sale, or the sale of any good in a manner that falsely suggests that it is Indian produced, an Indian product, or the product of a particular Indian and Indian tribe. It is a "truth-in-advertising law designed to prevent products from being marketed as 'Indian made, when the products are not, in fact, made by Indians as defined in the Act." The Indian Arts and Crafts Board was created by the Indian Arts and Crafts Act of 1935 to promote the economic development of American Indian and Alaska Natives through the expansion of the market of authentic Indian arts and crafts products.

The case was investigated by the FBI with assistance from the National Parks Service and the Department of the Interior's Indian Arts and Crafts Board, and was prosecuted by Assistant U.S. Attorney Paul H. Spiers.


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Sioux Indian Museum to feature Stephanie Hunter-Sorbel in a Special Exhibition


RAPID CITY, SOUTH DAKOTA - The Sioux Indian Museum, administered by the Indian Arts and Crafts Board of the U.S. Department of the Interior, will feature beadwork and quillwork by Stephanie Hunter-Sorbel. The exhibition will run from June 9, 2013, to August 11, 2013. On June 9, 2013, an opening reception will be held for the artist from 2:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. The artist will be available to discuss her work during the reception. The reception is free and open to the public.

Stephanie Hunter-Sorbel is an enrolled member of the Oglala Sioux Tribe. Currently she lives with her family in Kyle, South Dakota, where she is employed as the Director of the Pejuta Haka College Center.

Her interest in beadwork began when she was eight years old and continues to this day. Much of her work is produced for her family, many of whom participate in powwows. Inspiration for her work is often spontaneous; an evolving vision as she crafts a particular doll, or the observation of an object that she would like to bead. The dolls that she makes are influenced by the vibrant designs and colors found in the clothing and costumes of her heritage. Her work utilizes techniques of traditional quillwork and beadwork with a modern twist. She hopes to continue her love for the arts by teaching and creating many more pieces. Currently, she is passing her knowledge of quillwork and beadwork on to her daughters.

Stephanie's work has been featured in numerous art shows and she has garnered significant awards. Her work has been included in the Santa Fe Indian Market, the Northern Plains Indian Market, and the Black Hills Powwow Fine Arts Show. In 2010, she was awarded 1st place in the Quillwork Division at the Northern Plains Indian Art Market. She received the People's Choice Award at the 2012 Black Hills Powwow Fine Arts Show. In 2007, she was awarded a prestigious Oscar Howe residency at the University of South Dakota. Additionally, she was selected as an artist in residence for Agate Fossil Beds National Monument in 2004.

The Sioux Indian Museum is managed by the U.S. Department of the Interior, Indian Arts and Crafts Board. Regular viewing hours are Monday through Sunday, 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. The museum is located within the Journey Museum at 222 New York St. Rapid City, South Dakota. For more information call the museum at (605) 394-2381.


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Museum of the Plains Indian will begin summer schedule effective June 1st


March 29, 2013

BROWNING, MT - The Museum of the Plains Indian, administered by the Indian Arts and Crafts Board of the U.S. Department of the Interior, will begin summer hours of operation effective June 1st through September 30th. As a result of federal budget cuts due to sequestration, the Museum of the Plains Indian will not be open seven days per week during the summer of 2013. The Museum will be open Tuesday through Saturday from 9AM-4:45PM and will be closed on Sunday and Monday.

Admission rates are as follows:

Adults: $4.00
Children 6-12: $1.00
Children under 6: Free
Senior Citizen (over 65): $3.00
Groups of 10 or more: $3.00 per person
School Groups (students and escorts): Free
Blackfeet Tribal members: Free upon presentation of Tribal identification card
Shop customers and suppliers: Free

The Museum of the Plains Indian is managed by the Indian Arts and Crafts Board, U.S. Department of the Interior and is located at the junction of U.S. Highways 2 and 89 West in Browning, Montana. For more information contact the museum at (406) 338-2230.


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The IACB, a federal agency under the U.S. Department of the Interior, was established by Congress in 1935. Its dual mission is to promote authentic Native American art and craftwork of members of federally recognized Tribes, as well as to implement and enforce the Indian Arts and Crafts Act, which makes it illegal to fraudulently market art and craftwork as Indian made when it is not made by an Indian as defined by the Act.
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Sioux Indian Museum to feature Frederick Clarin in a Special Exhibition


March 29, 2013

RAPID CITY, SOUTH DAKOTA - The Sioux Indian Museum, administered by the Indian Arts and Crafts Board of the U.S. Department of the Interior, will feature paintings by Frederick Clarin. The exhibition will run from April 7, 2013, to May 30, 2013. On April 7, 2012, an opening reception will be held for the artist from 2:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. The artist will be available to discuss his work during the reception.

Frederick Clarin, an enrolled member of the Rosebud Sioux Tribe, currently resides in Rescue, California.

A self-taught artist, Mr. Clarin utilizes a style based in street art while incorporating his own techniques and themes. He learned the basis for his current techniques watching street artists work in Las Vegas, NV. Using a freestyle method, without preconceived notions of the final product, he layers paint onto a canvas. Working the paint with scrapers and paper he creates the final textures and images in the paintings. His artwork is a form of personal expression that allows him to interact with his environment and the media of the paintings.

He has participated in several group shows and his work is represented in both public and private collections including the Oscar Howe Art Gallery, Vermillion, SD, and in galleries in Hill City, SD. Mr. Clarin received a First Choice Award from American River College, Sacramento, CA, for his artwork.

Regular viewing hours are Monday through Saturday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Sunday, 1p.m.-5p.m. The museum is located within The Journey Museum at 222 New York St. Rapid City, SD. For more information, please call the museum at (605) 394-2381.


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The IACB, a federal agency under the U.S. Department of the Interior, was established by Congress in 1935. Its dual mission is to promote authentic Native American art and craftwork of members of federally recognized Tribes, as well as to implement and enforce the Indian Arts and Crafts Act, which makes it illegal to fraudulently market art and craftwork as Indian made when it is not made by an Indian as defined by the Act.
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Indian Arts and Crafts Board and the Oklahoma Attorney General's Office Announce Release of New Consumer Protection Brochure


January 24, 2013

WASHINGTON, DC - The Indian Arts and Crafts Board (IACB), an agency under the U.S. Department of the Interior, announces the release of a new consumer protection brochure, created in collaboration with the Oklahoma Attorney General's Office, Public Protection Unit, entitled Buying Authentic Oklahoma Indian Art and Craftwork.

The brochure provides information on the federal Indian Arts and Crafts Act, as well as the Oklahoma American Indian Arts and Crafts Sales Act. Consumers will find helpful information regarding the purchase of Indian art and craftwork, including buying tips and contact information for federal and State agencies handling complaints of fraudulently marketed Indian art and craftwork. The brochure also encourages consumers to purchase authentic Indian art and craftwork from members of federally recognized Tribes, particularly those artists and craftspeople residing in Oklahoma.

If you would like additional copies of the brochure, they can be obtained by calling the IACB toll free at 1-888-278-3253, or through email at iacb@ios.doi.gov. The brochure can also be viewed on the IACB's website at www.iacb.doi.gov


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The IACB, a federal agency under the U.S. Department of the Interior, was established by Congress in 1935. Its dual mission is to promote authentic Native American art and craftwork of members of federally recognized Tribes, as well as to implement and enforce the Indian Arts and Crafts Act, which makes it illegal to fraudulently market art and craftwork as Indian made when it is not made by an Indian as defined by the Act.
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California Man Charged with Falsely Claiming That His Jewelry was Produced by an Indian


Contact:
Elizabeth Martinez
Executive Assistant U.S. Attorney
Public Affairs Officer
Elizabeth.martinez@usdoj.gov
(505) 224-1469

September 27, 2012

ALBUQUERQUE - Andrew Gene Alvarez, 59, of Wofford Heights, California, has been indicted on a charge of falsely representing that jewelry he offered for sale was made by an Indian, announced U.S. Attorney Kenneth J. Gonzales.

Alvarez made his initial appearance on the indictment in Albuquerque federal court yesterday and entered a not guilty plea. He was released pending trial on conditions of release and pretrial supervision.

According to the indictment, on May 28, 2011, Alvarez offered for sale and sold jewelry at the Native Treasures Show at the Santa Fe Community Convention Center and falsely represented that the jewelry was produced by an Indian, in violation of the Indian Arts and Crafts Act, 18 U.S.C. § 1159. If convicted of the offense charged in the indictment, Alvarez faces up to five years of imprisonment and a $250,000 fine.

The Indian Arts and Crafts Act prohibits the offer or display for sale or the sale of any good in a manner that falsely suggests that it is Indian produced, an Indian product, or the product of a particular Indian and Indian tribe. It is a "truth-in-advertising law designed to prevent products from being marketed as 'Indian made, when the products are not, in fact, made by Indians as defined in the Act.'" The Indian Arts and Crafts Board was created by the Indian Arts and Crafts Act of 1935 to promote the economic development of American Indian and Alaska Natives through the expansion of the market of authentic Indian arts and crafts products.

The case was investigated by the FBI with assistance from the National Parks Service and the Department of the Interior's Indian Arts and Crafts Board. It is being prosecuted by Assistant U.S. Attorney Paul H. Spiers.


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Indian Arts and Crafts Board Comments on Conviction of Anchorage Man for Falsely Advertising Products as Alaska Native-Made


WASHINGTON, DC -The Indian Arts and Crafts Board of the U.S. Department of the Interior today praised federal agencies for work that led to the conviction of an Anchorage resident for violations of the Indian Arts and Crafts Act. Under the Act, it is illegal to falsely display, offer for sale, or sell a product as "Alaska Native," "American Indian," "Native American," or as the product of an Indian Tribe.

On August 1, 2012, Anchorage resident Edward R. Schlief was sentenced to three years of probation and fined $7,500 for falsely advertising seal skin bow hunting tabs as being made by Alaska Natives.

"This case provides an excellent example of cooperation to advance the rights and protections of Alaska Natives," said Rose Fosdick, who is Vice Chairman of the Indian Arts and Crafts Board and Vice President of Kawerak, Inc.'s Natural Resources Division in Nome, Alaska. "This conviction sends a strong message to all violators of the Act."

The U.S. Attorney's Office-District of Alaska, U.S. Department of Commerce's National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and the U.S. Department of the Interior's Fish and Wildlife Service worked collaboratively in this investigation to advance the rights and protections of Alaska Natives.

In 2010, President Obama signed the Indian Arts and Crafts Amendments Act to give all federal law enforcement professionals authority to conduct investigations of those who fraudulently market products as Indian-made in violation of the Act. The Indian Arts and Crafts Board at the U.S. Department of the Interior oversees enforcement of the Act.

The conviction reflected the fact that Schlief, who owned and operated Alaska Bowhunting Supply LLC, is neither an Alaska Native nor a member of any Indian Tribe, as defined by the Act. He illegally purchased and possessed unaltered seal skin hides, and knowingly provided these unaltered hides to a non-Alaska Native to produce seal skin bow hunting tabs. These products were then falsely advertised and sold through the Alaska Bowhunting Supply LLC website, as well as sold to retailers, as authentic Alaska Native handcrafts to enhance the value and marketability of these products. A total of more than 1,000 of the falsely represented products were sold over a period of four years for approximately $17,000.

"The sustainable take of marine mammals for food and handicrafts by Alaska Natives is an inherent component of our culture, way of life, and economic livelihood," added Fosdick. "For millennia Alaska Natives have used seal skin and today continue to use this valuable material for art and craftwork. Enforcement of the Indian Arts and Crafts Act is critical to the protection of long- term Alaska Native opportunities for subsistence resources and raw materials."

For more information on the Act, and protections for Alaska Natives and American Indians under the Act, please visit the Indian Arts and Crafts Board website at www.iacb.doi.gov, or call toll free at 1-888-ART-FAKE or 1-888-278-3253.


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Indian Arts and Crafts Board and the Office of the Attorney General of Texas Announce Release of New Consumer Protection Brochure


WASHINGTON, DC— The Indian Arts and Crafts Board (IACB), an agency under the U.S. Department of the Interior, would like to announce the release of a new consumer protection brochure, created in collaboration with the Office of the Attorney General of Texas, Consumer Protection Division.

The brochure provides information on the federal Indian Arts and Crafts Act, as well as the Texas Sale of Indian Articles Act and the Texas Deceptive Trade Practices - Consumer Protection Act.  Consumers will find helpful information regarding the purchase of Indian art and craftwork including buying tips and contact information for federal and State agencies handling complaints of fraudulently marketed Indian art and craftwork.  The brochure also encourages consumers to purchase authentic Indian art and craftwork from members of federally recognized Tribes, including those artists and craftspeople residing in Texas.

If you would like additional copies of the brochure, they can be obtained by calling the IACB toll free at 1-888-278-3253, or through email at iacb@ios.doi.gov.  The brochure can also be viewed on the IACB’s website at www.iacb.doi.gov.


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Indian Arts and Crafts Board and U.S. Patent and Trademark Office Release New Intellectual Property Protection Brochure


WASHINGTON, DC— The Indian Arts and Crafts Board (IACB), an agency of the U.S. Department of the Interior, has released a new intellectual property rights protection brochure, created in collaboration with the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO), and entitled Introduction to Intellectual Property for American Indian and Alaskan Native Artists.

The brochure provides an introduction to the various intellectual property rights protections –trademarks, copyright, design patents, trade secrets - afforded to American Indian and Alaskan Native artists and artisans. Intellectual property protection is important to every business, including American Indian and Alaskan Native artists, and this brochure will help teach artists and artisans how they can protect their intellectual property, economic livelihood, and cultural heritage.

If you would like additional copies of the brochure, they can be obtained by calling the IACB toll free at 1-888-278-3253, or through email at iacb@ios.doi.gov. The brochure can also be viewed on the IACB's website at www.iacb.doi.gov.
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Longtime DOI Sioux Indian Museum Curator Paulette Montileaux Garners Unexpected Honor



Paulette Montileaux, longtime curator of the U.S. Department of Interior’s Sioux Indian Museum in Rapid City, S.D., recently received an unexpected honor for her more than 42 years of service to DOI: On August 30, 2010, Sen. Tim Johnson of South Dakota presented Montileaux with a statement that he had entered into the Congressional Record honoring her years of service in preserving Native American history.

Johnson, who presented Montileaux with the statement during a ceremony in the museum, said in a news release: “The integrity of the collections within the Sioux Indian museum and their existence for future generations is in no small part thanks to Ms. Montileaux. … She has committed a lifetime of public service to helping preserve the culture, traditions and story of the Sioux people. I want to commend her for her dedication and honorable service.”

A member of the Rosebud Sioux Tribe, Montileaux served as a museum curator for 25 years. She began her career with DOI in 1967, as a clerk and a typist for the Indian Arts and Crafts Board. In 1978 she became a museum assistant; and in 1983, curator of the Sioux Indian Museum. Montileaux, who retired from DOI last March, said the honor was totally unexpected.

“I thought I would just retire and get my nice little letter of appreciation from the federal government,” Montileaux said. “But having Senator Johnson present me with a congressional statement thanking me for my service is really a great honor.”

“The law signed by President Obama yesterday expands our ability to enforce the Indian Arts and Crafts Act by authorizing all federal law enforcement officers to conduct investigations of those who fraudulently market arts and crafts as Indian-made in violation of the Act,” the Secretary said.

Montileaux added that the personal attachment she formed for many of the pieces in the museum made her decision to retire as curator a difficult one. However, since retiring, she said, she has begun to work with her husband, who is an artist, and has spent more time with their two granddaughters.









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New Law Promotes Authentic Indian Arts and Crafts, Cracks Down on Fraudulent Art



Washington, DC - Secretary of the Interior Ken Salazar today highlighted the importance of legislation President Obama just signed into law that promotes economic opportunities for Native American artists and craftspeople and protects consumers from fraudulent art and craftwork.

“The Indian Arts and Crafts Amendments Act is good news because it increases economic development and job opportunities for Native Americans who produce and market authentic Indian art and craftwork while cracking down on counterfeit marketers who are hurting sales of this authentic Indian work,” said Secretary Salazar. The total market for American Indian and Alaska Native arts and crafts in the United States is estimated at a billion dollars, with an unknown but substantial amount of those sales going to misrepresented, non-authentic works

The Secretary joined President Obama and Tribal leaders from across the nation yesterday at a White House signing ceremony for the Indian Arts and Crafts Amendments Act and Tribal Law and Order Act of 2010. The ceremony focused on the role of the law in helping tribal leaders combat violence and increase safety on Indian reservations by providing law enforcement resources.

The new law also strengthens the Indian Arts and Crafts Act, which makes it illegal to sell or offer or display for sale any art or craft product in a manner that falsely suggests it is Indian-produced, an Indian product, or the product of a particular Indian Tribe.

“The law signed by President Obama yesterday expands our ability to enforce the Indian Arts and Crafts Act by authorizing all federal law enforcement officers to conduct investigations of those who fraudulently market arts and crafts as Indian-made in violation of the Act,” the Secretary said.

The Indian Arts and Crafts Board (IACB), a federal agency under the Department of the Interior, administers and enforces the Indian Arts and Crafts Act. Before President Obama signed the new legislation into law yesterday, the Federal Bureau of Investigation was the only federal law enforcement agency with statutory authority to investigate alleged Indian Arts and Crafts Act violations. Under the new law, the IACB may refer potential Act violations for investigation to all federal law enforcement officers--including those from Department of the Interior bureaus, and can work with federal law enforcement officers who uncover violations of the Act in the course of their regular duties.

In addition, the new legislation strengthens the penalties for violations of the Act by imposing harsher penalties on those involved in more significant sales of arts and crafts misrepresented as Indian-made. For fraudulent works with a total sales transaction amount of $1,000 or more, a first-time violation by an individual will result in a fine of up to $250,000, imprisonment of up to five years, or both. A first-time violation by a business will result in a fine of up to $1 million.

For smaller cases with first-time violators, if the total sale amount is less than $1,000, an individual will face a fine of up to $25,000, imprisonment of up to a year, or both, and a business will face a fine of up to $100,000. In the case of a subsequent violation, regardless of the amount for which any item is offered or displayed for sale, or sold, an individual could be fined, imprisoned for up to 15 years, or both; and a business could be fined up to $5 million.

Established by Congress in 1935, the IACB promotes authentic Native American art and craftwork of members of federally recognized Tribes, as well as to implementing the Indian Arts and Crafts Act. For more information, see http://www.iacb.doi.gov.

###

PROTECTIONS FOR INDIAN ARTISTS AND ARTISANS



BROWNING, MT - The Indian Arts and Crafts Board, U.S. Department of the Interior, will host a free seminar, Promote and Protect Your Authentic Indian Art and Craftwork, on Saturday, July 31, 2010, at its Museum of the Plains Indian in Browning, Montana. The seminar will highlight the Indian Arts and Crafts Act, trademarks, copyrights, and patents, Internet marketing, and related business ideas that American Indian artists and artisans may use to promote and protect their traditional and contemporary creative works.

The seminar will serve as a platform for new marketing and promotional ideas and will provide a forum for participants to network and share their experiences as well as their art and craftwork with other Indian artists. As the misrepresentation of art and craftwork as genuine Indian products continues to have devastating effects on Tribal economies nationwide, the focus of the seminar is also to raise the visibility of the Indian Arts and Crafts Act and other laws that protect the livelihoods and cultural heritage of Indian Tribes and their members.

The seminar is free, and open to the public. Museum admission fees will be waived for seminar attendees. It will be held:

Saturday, July 31
9:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
The Museum of the Plains Indian
Intersection of U.S. Highways 2 & 89
Browning, Montana

For additional information on this seminar, please contact the Indian Arts and Crafts Board toll-free at 1-888-ART-FAKE, or email iacb@ios.doi.gov.

###

The IACB, a federal agency under the U.S. Department of the Interior, was established by Congress in 1935. Its dual mission is to promote authentic Native American art and craftwork of members of federally recognized Tribes, as well as to implement and enforce the Indian Arts and Crafts Act, which makes it illegal to fraudulently market art and craftwork as Indian made when it is not made by and Indian as defined by the Act.

Media Contacts
Indian Arts and Crafts Board

U.S. Department of the Interior
202-208-3773

Museum of the Plains Indian, IACB
U.S. Department of the Interior
406-338-2230


For immediate release: June 23, 2010

Secretary Salazar records PSA for the Indian Arts and Crafts Board



WASHINGTON, DC - Secretary of the Interior Ken Salazar recently highlighted the importance of the Indian Arts and Crafts Act by recording a public service announcement in video and audio on the importance of buying authentic Indian art and craft products from members of federally recognized Tribes.

The PSA can be found on the Indian Arts and Crafts Board’s (IACB) homepage at www.iacb.doi.gov.

This is Secretary of the Interior Ken Salazar.

Before you purchase Indian arts and crafts, make sure that you are buying an authentic Indian-made item. A seller with authentic goods will gladly provide information in a written guarantee that the product is indeed the authentic work by members of federally recognized Tribes.

To learn more call toll free 1-888-ART-FAKE. Be a smart consumer and buy authentic.

The IACB, a federal office under the U.S. Department of the Interior, was established by Congress in 1935. Its dual mission is to promote authentic Native American art and craftwork of members of federally recognized Tribes, as well as to implement and enforce the Indian Arts and Crafts Act, which makes it illegal to fraudulently market art and craftwork as Indian made when it is not made by and Indian as defined by the Act.

Media contacts:                                        
Joan Moody
202-208-6416

Meridith Stanton
202-208-3773


PROTECTIONS FOR INDIAN ARTISTS AND ARTISANS



ANADARKO, O.K.— The Indian Arts and Crafts Board (IACB), U.S. Department of the Interior, will host a free seminar, Promote and Protect Your Authentic Indian Art and Craftwork, on Thursday, July 8, 2010, at its Southern Plains Indian Museum in Anadarko, Oklahoma.  The seminar will highlight the Indian Arts and Crafts Act, trademarks, copyrights, patents, Internet marketing, and related business ideas that American Indian artists and artisans may use to promote and protect their traditional and contemporary creative works. 

The seminar will serve as a platform for new marketing and promotional ideas and will provide a forum for participants to network and share their experiences as well, as their art and craftwork with other Indian artists. As the misrepresentation of art and craftwork as genuine Indian products continues to have devastating effects on Tribal economies nationwide, the focus of the seminar is also to raise the visibility of the Indian Arts and Crafts Act and other laws that protect the livelihoods and cultural heritage of Indian Tribes and their members.

The seminar is free, and open to the public.  It will be held:

Thursday, July 8
9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.
Southern Plains Indian Museum
U.S. Department of the Interior
715 East Central Boulevard
Anadarko, Oklahoma


For additional information on this seminar, please contact the IACB toll-free at 1-888-ART-FAKE, or email iacb@ios.doi.gov.

The IACB, a federal agency under the U.S. Department of the Interior, was established by Congress in 1935.  Its dual mission is to promote authentic Native American art and craftwork of members of federally recognized Tribes, as well as to implement and enforce the Indian Arts and Crafts Act, which makes it illegal to fraudulently market art and craftwork as Indian made when it is not made by and Indian as defined by the Act.

Media contacts:                                        
Indian Arts and Crafts Board      
U.S. Department of the Interior
202-208-3773

Southern Plains Indian Museum, IACB
U.S. Department of the Interior
405-247-6221


PROTECTIONS FOR INDIAN ARTISTS AND ARTISANS



ANADARKO, O.K.— The Indian Arts and Crafts Board (IACB), U.S. Department of the Interior, will host a free seminar, Promote and Protect Your Authentic Indian Art and Craftwork, on Thursday, July 8, 2010, at its Southern Plains Indian Museum in Anadarko, Oklahoma.  The seminar will highlight the Indian Arts and Crafts Act, trademarks, copyrights, patents, Internet marketing, and related business ideas that American Indian artists and artisans may use to promote and protect their traditional and contemporary creative works. 

The seminar will serve as a platform for new marketing and promotional ideas and will provide a forum for participants to network and share their experiences as well, as their art and craftwork with other Indian artists. As the misrepresentation of art and craftwork as genuine Indian products continues to have devastating effects on Tribal economies nationwide, the focus of the seminar is also to raise the visibility of the Indian Arts and Crafts Act and other laws that protect the livelihoods and cultural heritage of Indian Tribes and their members.

The seminar is free, and open to the public.  It will be held:

Thursday, July 8
9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.
Southern Plains Indian Museum
U.S. Department of the Interior
715 East Central Boulevard
Anadarko, Oklahoma


For additional information on this seminar, please contact the IACB toll-free at 1-888-ART-FAKE, or email iacb@ios.doi.gov.

The IACB, a federal agency under the U.S. Department of the Interior, was established by Congress in 1935.  Its dual mission is to promote authentic Native American art and craftwork of members of federally recognized Tribes, as well as to implement and enforce the Indian Arts and Crafts Act, which makes it illegal to fraudulently market art and craftwork as Indian made when it is not made by and Indian as defined by the Act.

Media contacts:                                        
Indian Arts and Crafts Board      
U.S. Department of the Interior
202-208-3773

Southern Plains Indian Museum, IACB
U.S. Department of the Interior
405-247-6221


Choctaw Seminar



DURANT, O.K.— The Indian Arts and Crafts Board (IACB), U.S. Department of the Interior, in collaboration with the Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma, will host a free seminar, Promote and Protect Your Authentic Indian Art and Craftwork, on Saturday, July 10, 2010, at the Choctaw Nation Community Center in Durant, Oklahoma.  The seminar will highlight the Indian Arts and Crafts Act, trademarks, copyrights, patents, Internet marketing, and related business ideas that American Indian artists and artisans may use to promote and protect their traditional and contemporary creative works. 

The seminar will serve as a platform for new marketing and promotional ideas and will provide a forum for participants to network and share their experiences, as well as their art and craftwork with other Indian artists. As the misrepresentation of art and craftwork as genuine Indian products continues to have devastating effects on Tribal economies nationwide, the focus of the seminar is also to raise the visibility of the Indian Arts and Crafts Act and other laws that protect the livelihoods and cultural heritage of Indian Tribes and their members.

The seminar is free, and open to the public.  It will be held:

Saturday, July 10
9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.
Choctaw Nation Community Center
2750 Big Lots Parkway
Durant, Oklahoma

For additional information on this seminar, please contact the IACB toll-free at 1-888-ART-FAKE, or email iacb@ios.doi.gov.

The IACB, a federal agency under the U.S. Department of the Interior, was established by Congress in 1935.  Its dual mission is to promote authentic Native American art and craftwork of members of federally recognized Tribes, as well as to implement and enforce the Indian Arts and Crafts Act, which makes it illegal to fraudulently market art and craftwork as Indian made when it is not made by and Indian as defined by the Act.

Media contacts:          
Indian Arts and Crafts Board      
U.S. Department of the Interior
202-208-3773

Vonna Schultz
Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma
800-522-6170 Ext. 2347


Cherokee Seminar



TAHLEQUAH, O.K.— The Indian Arts and Crafts Board (IACB), U.S. Department of the Interior, in collaboration with the Cherokee Nation, will host a free seminar, Promote and Protect Your Authentic Indian Art and Craftwork, on Sunday, July 11, 2010, at the Cherokee Nation Tribal Complex, Osiyo Training Room, Tahlequah, Oklahoma. The seminar will highlight the Indian Arts and Crafts Act, trademarks, copyrights, patents, Internet marketing, and related business ideas that American Indian artists and artisans may use to promote and protect their traditional and contemporary creative works.

The seminar will serve as a platform for new marketing and promotional ideas and will provide a forum for participants to network and share their experiences, as well as their art and craftwork with other Indian artists. As the misrepresentation of art and craftwork as genuine Indian products continues to have devastating effects on Tribal economies nationwide, the focus of the seminar is also to raise the visibility of the Indian Arts and Crafts Act and other laws that protect the livelihoods and cultural heritage of Indian Tribes and their members.

The seminar is free, and open to the public.  It will be held:

Sunday, July 11
9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.
Cherokee Nation Tribal Complex
17675 S. Muskogee Avenue
Tahlequah, Oklahoma


For additional information on this seminar, please contact the IACB toll-free at 1-888-ART-FAKE, or email iacb@ios.doi.gov.

The IACB, a federal agency under the U.S. Department of the Interior, was established by Congress in 1935. Its dual mission is to promote authentic Native American art and craftwork of members of federally recognized Tribes, as well as to implement and enforce the Indian Arts and Crafts Act, which makes it illegal to fraudulently market art and craftwork as Indian made when it is not made by and Indian as defined by the Act.

Media contacts:             
Indian Arts and Crafts Board      
U.S. Department of the Interior
(202) 208-3773


Cherokee Nation
(918) 453-5728

Joyce Begay-Foss and Elmer Guy Selected as Indian Arts and Crafts Board Chairperson and Vice Chairperson



WASHINGTON, D.C-- Joyce Begay-Foss (Diné) and Elmer Guy (Diné) have been named the Chairperson and Vice Chairperson, respectively, of the Indian Arts and Crafts Board (IACB), U.S. Department of the Interior.

The IACB carries out the Indian Arts and Crafts Act of 1990, combats counterfeit activity in the Native American arts and crafts market, promotes the economic development of American Indians and Alaska Natives through their creative work, and operates three Indian museums in the Plains Region.

"I am very honored to have been re-elected Chairperson of the IACB. I look forward to continuing my work with Vice Chairperson Guy, IACB Commissioners, and staff to promote authentic Native American art and craftwork and to combat the sale of counterfeit products. Specifically, I want to address the negative economic and cultural impact on Native American communities caused by imported goods sold as authentic Native American art and crafts. In the past year we have successfully collaborated with the New Mexico Attorney General's office and other State and federal agencies to address art and craftwork fraudulently sold as Native American, and look forward to expanding our efforts in 2010," said Chairperson Begay-Foss. "To assist with our efforts, we ask that consumers shop wisely and follow the buying tips posted on the IACB website, www.iacb.doi.gov, such as requesting a written guarantee of authenticity when purchasing Native American art crafts. We also encourage Native American artists to label their products with their name, tribal affiliation, and other pertinent information such as methods and materials used in the production of their work." Chairperson Begay-Foss noted.

Chairperson Begay-Foss is the Director of Education at the Museum of Indian Arts and Culture in Santa Fe, New Mexico. The museum, operated by the New Mexico Department of Cultural Affairs, preserves and interprets historic and contemporary collections and information about New Mexico's Native peoples.

An accomplished Navajo weaver for over 25 years, Begay-Foss has won numerous awards at the Santa Fe Indian Market, Eight Northern Pueblos Arts and Crafts Show, and the San Felipe Arts and Crafts Show. She draws on this expertise as a writer, instructor, and lecturer on traditional Native textiles and dying techniques. She has been involved in addressing issues and concerns of intellectual and cultural property rights of the Southwestern Tribes, especially with Diné (Navajo) weavers.

Vice Chairperson Guy is President of Navajo Technical College, a tribal college established and chartered by the Navajo Nation. He has served a broad range of educational organizations in a variety of capacities. He is a board member to the American Indian Higher Education Consortium and presently serves on the Board of Trustees for the American Indian College Fund. Dr. Guy served on the boards of the Navajo North Central Association, the Dine College Board of Regents, and the National Indian Education Association. He was also an advisory member to the American Indian Rehabilitation Research and Training Center at Northern Arizona University.

Vice Chairperson Guy received his B.A. in Special Education from the University of Arizona in 1977 and his M.A. in Rehabilitation Administration from the University of San Francisco in 1978. Dr. Guy obtained his PhD in Rehabilitation from the University of Arizona in May 2009.

"It is an honor and a pleasure to serve as Vice Chairman of the IACB," states Vice Chairperson Guy. "As a long time advocate for Indian education and culture, I look forward to assisting the IACB staff with expanding their work to raise awareness of Indian Arts and Crafts Act protections for Indian artists, and promoting the Act throughout the Indian arts and crafts industry to ensure compliance," said Vice-Chairperson Guy.

The three additional members of the Indian Arts and Crafts Board are Rebecca Webster (Oneida), Senior Staff Attorney for the Oneida Tribe; Rose Fosdick (Nome Eskimo Community), Vice President of Kawerak, Inc.'s Natural Resources Division, Nome, Alaska; and Chuck Harwood, Deputy Director of the Federal Trade Commission's (FTC) Bureau of Consumer Protection, Washington, D.C.

For more information on the IACB Commissioners, the Indian Arts and Crafts Act, and the activities of the IACB, please visit www.iacb.doi.gov., or call 1-888-ART-FAKE (toll free).

Media contact:

Joan Moody 202-208-3773


Protections for Indian Artists and Artisans



RAPID CITY, S.D. — The Indian Arts and Crafts Board (IACB), U.S. Department of the Interior, will host a free seminar, Promote and Protect Your Authentic Indian Art and Craftwork, on Friday, November 20, 2009, at the Red Cloud Indian School’s Eben Hall in Pine Ridge South Dakota, and on Saturday, November 21, 2009, at its Sioux Indian Museum, located in The Journey Museum, Rapid City, South Dakota. These seminars will highlight the Indian Arts and Crafts Act, trademarks, copyrights, patents, Internet marketing, and related business ideas that American Indian artists and artisans may use to promote and protect their traditional and contemporary creative works.

The seminars will serve as a platform for new marketing and promotional ideas and will provide a forum for participants to network and share their experiences, as well as their art and craftwork with other Indian artists. As the misrepresentation of art and craftwork as genuine Indian products continues to have devastating effects on Tribal economies nationwide, the focus of the seminars is also to raise the visibility of the Indian Arts and Crafts Act and other laws that protect the livelihoods and cultural heritage of Indian Tribes and their members.

The seminars are free, and open to the public. They will be held:

Friday, November 20
10:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
Eben Hall, Red Cloud Indian School
100 Mission Drive
Pine Ridge, South Dakota  
Saturday, November 21
9:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
The Journey Museum, Wells Fargo Theatre
222 New York Street
Rapid City, South Dakota







For additional information on this seminar, please contact the IACB toll-free at 1-888-ART-FAKE, or email iacb@ios.doi.gov

The IACB, a federal agency under the U.S. Department of the Interior, was established by Congress in 1935. Its dual mission is to promote authentic Native American art and craftwork of members of federally recognized Tribes, as well as to implement and enforce the Indian Arts and Crafts Act, which makes it illegal to fraudulently market art and craftwork as Indian made when it is not made by and Indian as defined by the Act.

Media contacts:
Indian Arts and Crafts Board
U.S. Department of the Interior
202-208-3773

Sioux Indian Museum, IACB
U.S. Department of the Interior
605-394-2381







Federal Indian Arts and Crafts Board Works With New Mexico Attorney General to Shut Down Sales of Fake Indian Arts and Crafts



Consent Decree with Santa Fe Company Provides for More Than $12,000 in Penalties, Offers Refunds to Customers

WASHINGTON, D.C. - The Indian Arts and Crafts Board (IACB), U.S. Department of the Interior, is pleased to join with New Mexico Attorney General Gary King in announcing a Consent Decree reached by the New Mexico Attorney General's (NMAG) office with Golden Bear Trading, Inc., of Santa Fe on July 29, 2009. The Decree halts the fraudulent sales of Indian art and craftwork by Golden Bear Trading. This case is an important victory in the on going battle against fraudulent Indian art and craftwork in the Southwest.

The Decree culminates a three-year cooperative investigation between the IACB and the NMAG's office into jewelry purportedly made by well-known Native American artisan Calvin Begay. Golden Bear Trading will pay more than $12,000 in restitution and penalties to the IACB and the NMAG's office, as well as provide refunds for a four month period to consumers who purchased jewelry under the false assumption it was produced by prominent Navajo jeweler Calvin Begay.

"I want to congratulate Attorney General King and his able staff for helping to lead this investigation and for bringing this successful action," said Meridith Z. Stanton, IACB Director. "State agencies like the NMAG's office are invaluable partners in the effort to eradicate fake Indian art and craftwork from the marketplace, and the IACB looks forward to continuing to work closely with Attorney General King and his office in pursuing additional enforcement efforts in the New Mexico Indian arts and crafts marketplace."

Golden Bear Trading permanently closed its business on July 4, 2009. If you have knowledge of fraudulent Indian art and craftwork or would like more information about the IACB, please call toll-free at 1-888-ART-FAKE, or visit www.iacb.doi.gov. For more information on the Decree, as well as refund procedures, visit the NMAG's website at www.nmag.gov.

The IACB, a federal agency under the U.S. Department of the Interior, was established by Congress in 1935. Its dual mission is to promote authentic Native American art and craftwork of members of federally recognized Tribes, as well as to implement and enforce the Indian Arts and Crafts Act, which makes it illegal to fraudulently market art and craftwork as Indian made when it is not made by and Indian as defined by the Act.

Media contact:

Meridith Stanton (202) 208-3773

Virtual Summit for Small Business - September 15, 2009



The Indian Arts and Crafts Board has become aware of an opportunity for small business owners to participate in a Virtual Summit for Small Businesses, presented by eBay and the National Federation of Independent Business.

The online networking and educational event will be held on September 15, 2009, and will feature presentations on “The Keys to Success for your eBay Sales,” “Digital Marketing and Social Networking,” “Healthcare for Small Business,” and “Focus on the Economy.” Participants will also be able to access a virtual exhibit hall and participate in several networking opportunities. You can register at the event’s web site:

http://www.nfib.com/MemberBenefits/VirtualSummitLP.aspx?WT.mc_id=bnr006

U.S. Department of the Interior and New Mexico Office of the Attorney General Promote Authentic Indian Arts and Crafts



WASHINGTON, D.C-- The Indian Arts and Crafts Board (IACB) of the U.S. Department of the Interior and the New Mexico Office of the Attorney General have collaborated to publish a consumer protection brochure tailored to the New Mexico Indian arts and crafts market.

Called Take Home a Treasure from Indian Country: Buy Authentic New Mexico Indian Arts and Crafts, this new brochure provides information on the Federal and state laws designed to protect the sales of authentic Indian arts and crafts, as well as helpful tips for buyers to determine the authenticity of the items.

Annual sales of Indian arts and crafts in the United States are estimated to total more than one billion dollars. Purchasing authentic Indian arts and crafts helps to preserve and perpetuate Indian culture and traditions. As the popularity of Indian arts and crafts increases, so does the sale of items misrepresented as authentic Indian products. By becoming more familiar with both the Federal and state laws governing the sales of Indian arts and crafts, and by considering the shopping tips provided in the new brochure, consumers can help to ensure they are buying authentic Indian arts and crafts.

Under the Federal Indian Arts and Crafts Act of 1990 as amended (P.L. 101-644); it is illegal to offer or display for sale, or sell, any art or craft product in a manner that falsely suggests it is American Indian produced, an American Indian product, or the product of a particular American Indian tribe. Under the Federal Act, Indian labor makes art or craftwork an Indian product.

"The IACB is very pleased to continue its close work with the New Mexico Office of the Attorney General through this excellent educational collaboration," says IACB Chairperson Joyce Begay-Foss (Navajo), "We would also like to thank the Museum of Indian Arts and Culture/Laboratory of Anthropology, Department of Cultural Affairs, for the use of their images in this lovely publication."

The New Mexico Indian Arts and Crafts Sales Act (NMSA 1978, § 30-33-1 to 30-33-11) provides definitions for "Indian handmade," "authentic Indian arts and crafts," and "Indian crafted." It also addresses the use of materials. For example, the state statute requires that sellers disclose if any of the products use treated material, including stabilized, reconstructed or reconstituted, or synthetic (plastic) turquoise.

"It is critically important that consumers educate themselves before buying Indian arts and crafts because it is so easy to buy fake products," says Attorney General Gary King. "This brochure is an important consumer education tool, and we urge all consumers to take advantage of this valuable resource. I am grateful for the cooperation and assistance of the Federal Indian Arts and Crafts Board."

The brochure is available free of charge by contacting the IACB, U.S. Department of the Interior, at 1-888-ART-FAKE or 1-888-278-3253, or the New Mexico Office of the Attorney General's Consumer Protection Division at 1-800-678-1508. Additional information on the IACB is available at www.iacb.doi.gov.

Media Contacts:

Joan Moody 202-208-3773

Joyce Begay-Foss and Rebecca Webster Selected as Indian Arts and Crafts Board Chairperson and Vice Chairperson


WASHINGTON, D.C-- Joyce Begay-Foss (Diné) and Rebecca Webster (Oneida) have been named the Chairperson and Vice Chairperson, respectively, of the Indian Arts and Crafts Board.

The Board carries out the Indian Arts and Crafts Act of 1990; combats counterfeit activity in the Native American arts and crafts market; promotes the economic development of American Indians and Alaska Natives through their creative work; and operates three Indian museums in the Plains Region.

"I am honored to serve as Indian Arts and Crafts Board Chairperson and look forward to working with Vice Chairperson Webster, the other Commissioners, and the staff," Begay-Foss said. "We must ensure that the Board continues to advance and protect the vitality and integrity of the American Indian and Alaska Native arts and crafts market and producers of true American treasures from Barrow, Alaska, to Miccosukee, Florida."

"In addition, I would like to invite Native American artists and tribal communities throughout the country to engage in discussions and recommendations about the issues that impact their work and livelihood by contacting the Indian Arts and Crafts Board with their concerns, Begay-Foss noted."

Chairman Begay-Foss is the Director of Education at the Museum of Indian Arts and Culture in Santa Fe, New Mexico. The museum, operated by the New Mexico Department of Cultural Affairs, preserves and interprets historic and contemporary collections and information about New Mexico's Native peoples.

An accomplished Navajo weaver for over 25 years, Begay-Foss has won numerous awards at the Santa Fe Indian Market, Eight Northern Pueblos Arts and Crafts Show, and the San Felipe Arts and Crafts Show. She draws on this expertise as a writer, instructor, and lecturer on traditional Native textiles and dying techniques. She has been involved in addressing issues and concerns of intellectual and cultural property rights of the Southwestern Tribes, especially with Diné (Navajo) weavers.

Vice Chairperson Webster serves the Oneida Tribe as a staff attorney, providing legal advice focusing on tribal land issues and government-to-government relations. She is also an accomplished artisan, specializing in unique Iroquois raised beadwork which has won her awards at Oneida art shows.

As an active community member, Webster has dedicated herself to preserving Oneida culture, arts, and crafts by teaching others forms of Oneida craftwork, including traditional corn husk dolls, moccasins, clothing, and silver jewelry. She received her Bachelor of Arts degree in Political Science from the University of Wisconsin-Madison, her Masters degree in Public Management from the Robert M. LaFollette School of Public Affairs, and her Juris Doctor degree from the University of Wisconsin Law School.

"Serving as a Commissioner on the Indian Arts and Crafts Board has provided me with an excellent opportunity to gain a better understanding of the diverse, rich, and complex spectrum of Native American arts and crafts," Webster said.

"As Vice Chairperson, I look forward to advancing the levels of education, compliance, and enforcement of the Indian Arts and Crafts Act among consumers, Native American artists and artisans, and the arts and crafts industry," said Webster. "One of my goals is to assist in promoting Woodland Indian art and encouraging Native American artisans from the Woodland Indian tribes through Indian Arts and Crafts Board outreach efforts."

The three additional members of the Indian Arts and Crafts Board are Elmer Guy (Diné), president of the Navajo Technical College, Crownpoint, New Mexico; Rose Fosdick (Nome Eskimo Community), vice president of Kawerak, Inc.'s Natural Resources Division, Nome, Alaska; and Chuck Harwood, director of the Northwest Regional Office of the Federal Trade Commission, Seattle, Washington.

For more information on the Indian Arts and Crafts Board commissioners, the Indian Arts and Crafts Act, and the activities of the Board, please visit www.iacb.doi.gov., or call 1-888-ART-FAKE (toll free).

Media Contacts:

Joan Moody 202-208-3773


Federal and State Collaboration Results in Crackdown On Marketing of Fake Indian Arts and Crafts



WASHINGTON, D.C-- Secretary of the Interior Dirk Kempthorne said today that a recent jury verdict is an example of an ongoing crackdown on sales of fake Indian arts and crafts led by the Department of the Interior Indian Arts and Crafts Board. A jury in Gallup, New Mexico, convicted local arts dealer Amro Al-Assi of fraud on August 16, 2007. The Board is currently conducting other investigations into those who sell counterfeit American Indian arts and crafts.

"This verdict should send a strong message to the Indian arts and crafts marketplace and to the buying public that sales of counterfeit or otherwise misrepresented Indian arts and crafts to consumers will not be tolerated," said Kempthorne. "Such fraudulent sales are eroding the market for authentic Indian work."

Al-Assi, then co-owner and manager of the Silver Bear Trading Company in downtown Gallup, was convicted of selling a counterfeit bracelet as the work of a well-known Navajo jeweler, Jesse Monongya, whose original works command high prices in the market.

The purchaser of the bracelet had originally filed a complaint with the Board at Interior. The Board enforces the Indian Arts and Crafts Act, a federal truth-in-marketing law that prohibits the sale of arts or crafts that are counterfeit or falsely represented as American Indian or Native American made, or as the product of a particular individual Indian artisan, unless the item was produced by a member of a federally or officially state recognized Indian Tribe.

The Board collaborated with Interior's Office of Inspector General, Albuquerque, New Mexico, and the Federal Bureau of Investigation in Gallup, New Mexico, to launch a joint investigation. By collaborating with the Eleventh Judicial Division II District Attorney's Office in Gallup, District Attorney Karl R. Gillson's office ultimately chose to prosecute the case under its state fraud statute.

"McKinley County District Attorney Karl Gilson and his staff are to be highly commended for their outstanding expertise, dedication, and hard work to obtain this important conviction. The Board is continuing to receive additional information regarding fraudulent activity in the Indian arts and crafts market, and we are pursuing other investigations," said the Board Director Meridith Stanton. DA Gillson said that there was "no room to plead this down to anything less than a felony" but to take it to trial and let the local community of jurors hear and decide Al-Assi's fate. Gillson said, "Clearly, the jury sent the message that maintaining the integrity of communities and of the Native American arts and crafts industry is vital and important to the Indian peoples' livelihood and the communities' economic endurance." Mr. Gillson said that his office "will continue to collaborate with the Indian Arts and Crafts Board and other federal and state law enforcement agencies to combat this tide.

Most recently an agreement between Interior and the FBI was finalized that authorizes all appropriate Interior law enforcement professionals, including the Bureau of Indian Affairs, National Park Service, Fish and Wildlife Service and Bureau of Land Management, to investigate complaints filed under the Indian Arts and Crafts Act. For more information on federal and state laws regulating the sale of Indian arts and crafts, please contact the Board using its toll free telephone number, 888.278.3253, or visit the Board website at www.iacb.doi.gov.

Media Contacts:

Meridith Stanton 202-208-6416
Joan Moody 202-208-3773


NATIONAL PARKS TO HIGHLIGHT AUTHENTIC INDIAN ARTS AND CRAFTS



WASHINGTON, D.C.--The National Park Service recently published a regulation that encourages concessioners within national parks to sell genuine American Indian and Alaska Native handcrafts; to make sure that the handcrafts are appropriately labeled, or otherwise identified, as authentic; and to strive to reflect the cultural, historical and geographical characteristics of the park area.

"Thanks to this new park regulation, visitors to national parks now can shop with more confidence that the Native American handcraft products offered for sale are authentic," Secretary of the Interior Dirk Kempthorne said.

Through these expanded efforts consumers will be able to more readily distinguish art or craft items made by Native Americans from non-Indian made replicas and imports. "By adhering to these good business and truth-in-advertising practices, the concessioners are eligible for specific contract franchise fee exemptions," noted Jo Pendry, NPS Concessions manager.

The new product identification can be provided through an attached label or separate tag, paper, sign, sticker or signed document from the artist or craftsperson. Park visitors will benefit by the inclusion of information attesting to the authenticity of the item, and by learning about regional tribes, art forms and customs. Tribal artisans will profit as well, enjoying both economic development opportunities and acknowledgement for their unique art and craftwork.

"The Indian Arts and Crafts Board (IACB), part of the Department of the Interior, appreciates that the National Park Service consulted with us when preparing this language to support the Indian Arts and Crafts Act (Act) and the IACB's mission," said Meridith Stanton, IACB Director. Implemented by the IACB, the Act is essentially a truth-in-advertising law which prohibits the sale of arts or crafts as Indian made, unless the maker is enrolled in a federally or officially state-recognized tribe, or is a certified as a non-member Indian artisan. Criminal and civil penalties exist for violations of the Act.

Media Contacts:

Meridith Stanton
Joan Moody

202-208-6416



SECRETARY OF THE INTERIOR KEMPTHRONE RELEASES PSA ABOUT BUYING AUTHENTIC INDIAN ARTS AND CRAFTS



Secretary of the Interior Dirk Kempthorne has recorded a 30-second public service announcement on the importance of making sure Indian arts and crafts are authentic. The PSA is timeless but was prepared in conjunction with the 84th Annual Santa Fe Indian Market scheduled for August 18-19, 2007 in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

The PSA can be found at PSA_Indian_Art

If you cannot download the audio PSA by Secretary Kempthorne, please consider using the script below as a reader.

Before you purchase Indian arts and crafts, make sure you are buying an authentic Indian-made item. A seller with authentic goods will gladly provide information and a written guarantee that the product is indeed the work of Indians or Native Americans. To learn more, call toll-free, 1-888-ART-FAKE. Be a smart consumer. Buy authentic.
Through the Indian Arts and Crafts Board, one of its agencies, the U.S. Department of the Interior, promotes the economic development of American Indians and Alaska Natives by encouraging expansion of the Indian arts and crafts market. A top priority of the IACB is the implementation and enforcement of the Indian Arts and Crafts Act of 1990, a truth-in-advertising law that provides criminal and civil penalties for marketing products as "Indian-made" when such products are not made by Indians, as defined by the Act.

Media Contact:
Joan Moody
202-208-6416


AUTHENTIC OR COUNTERFEIT? HOW TO BUY GENUINE AMERICAN INDIAN ARTS AND CRAFTS



Whether drawn to the beauty of turquoise and silver jewelry or the earth tone colors of Indian pottery, having some knowledge about American Indian arts and crafts can help consumers get the most for their money. The Indian Arts and Crafts Board, U.S. Department of the Interior, and the Federal Trade Commission caution consumers that there are unscrupulous dealers who sell imitations, trying to pass them off as authentic and made by an American Indian artist. The IACB and FTC will be offering a brochure with tips to coincide with various American Indian and cultural events this summer, including the Santa Fe Indian Market in Santa Fe, New Mexico, August 19-20.

The Indian Arts and Crafts Act of 1990 makes it illegal to advertise or sell any art or craft in a way that falsely suggests it is produced by an American Indian or is the product of a particular American Indian tribe. All claims about the Indian origin and tribal affiliation for any product must be truthful.

To help consumers shop wisely, the IACB and the FTC have published a brochure: "How to Buy Genuine American Indian Arts and Crafts," available at iacb.doi.gov/brochures/indianartftc.pdf or ftc.gov/bcp/conline/pubs/products/indianart.pdf. The brochure explains the types of materials used in these products, and includes buying tips:
  • Buy from an established dealer who will give you a written guarantee or written verification of authenticity.
  • Get a receipt that includes all the vital information about the value of your purchase, including any verbal representations. For example, if the salesperson told you that the piece of jewelry you're buying is sterling silver and natural turquoise and was handmade by an American Indian artisan, insist that this information appear on your receipt.
  • Before buying Indian arts and crafts at powwows, annual fairs, juried competitions, and other events, check the event requirements for information about the authenticity of the products being offered for sale. Many events list their requirements in newspaper ads, promotional flyers, and printed programs. If the event organizers make no statement about the authenticity of Indian arts and crafts being offered for sale, get written verification of authenticity for any item you purchase that claims to be authentic.

Copies of the Indian Arts and Crafts Act and related regulations are available from the IACB's web site at www.iacb.doi.gov. The IACB was created by Congress to promote the economic development of American Indians and Alaska Natives through the expansion of the Indian arts and crafts market. A top priority of the IACB is the implementation and enforcement of the Indian Arts and Crafts Act of 1990. The Indian Arts and Crafts Board is the only federal agency that is consistently and exclusively concerned with the economic benefits of Native American cultural development.

More information about the FTC and its consumer protection programs can be found at http://www.ftc.gov and also from the FTC's Consumer Response Center, Room 130, 600 Pennsylvania Avenue, N.W., Washington, D.C. 20580.

MEDIA CONTACT: Indian Arts and Crafts Board (202) 208-3773



INDIAN ARTS AND CRAFTS DIRECTORY ONLINE



Directory of American Indian and Alaska Native arts and crafts businesses available at www.iacb.doi.gov

Washington, D.C. - The Indian Arts and Crafts Board (IACB), an agency of the U.S. Department of the Interior, announces the posting of its updated Source Directory of American Indian and Alaska Native Owned and Operated Arts and Crafts Businesses now available at www.iacb.doi.gov.

Organized by state, the Source Directory includes federally recognized American Indian and Alaska Native artists and craftspeople, cooperatives, tribal arts and crafts enterprises, businesses privately-owned and operated by federally recognized American Indian and Alaska Native artists, designers, and craftspeople, and businesses privately owned and operated by American Indian and Alaska Native merchants who retail and/or wholesale authentic Indian and Alaska Native arts and crafts. The Source Directory is accessible to the public, serving as a direct link between the arts and crafts businesses and prospective customers.

The Source Directory will be updated monthly as new applications for business listings are received and approved. This service is available only to individuals who are enrolled members of federally recognized Indian Tribes or Alaska Native groups. In addition to a completed application, applicants will be required to provide a copy of tribal enrollment documentation from his or her respective federally recognized Tribe or Alaska Native group. To be listed is free.

To receive an application to be listed in the Source Directory, contact the IACB using its toll free telephone number, 888.278.3253, or write to Indian Arts and Crafts Board, U.S. Department of the Interior, 1849 C St., NW, MS 2528-MIB, Washington, DC 20240. Please specify if the application is for an individual or for a group, such as a cooperative or tribal enterprise.




SUPPORT FOR AUTHENTIC ALASKA NATIVE ARTS - Resources to combat fraudulent products



As the cultural tourism industry continues to dramatically grow throughout Alaska, the demand for premium Alaska Native arts and crafts has expanded as well. Unfortunately, as the popularity of these high quality and unique art forms continues to increase, so does the production and sale of items misrepresented as authentic Alaska Native work.

The Indian Arts and Crafts Board will be hosting the Federal Trade Commission (FTC), and displaying information from federal and State agencies, at an information booth during the annual Alaska Federation of Natives Convention, October 20-22, 2005. Through this partnership at the AFN convention, IACB and FTC representatives will have the opportunity to assess how their agencies may better serve the Alaska Native artists and craftspeople. Additionally, they will be available to answer questions regarding their programs and educate convention attendees on the protections and rights granted to Alaska Native artists and craftspeople under various federal and State laws.

The IACB will be promoting its Indian Arts and Crafts Act, a truth-in-advertising law which prohibits the sale of arts or crafts as Alaska Native or Indian made unless the products are made by a member of a federally or officially State recognized Tribe or Alaska Native Village. The IACB receives and refers valid complaints regarding violations of the Indian Arts and Crafts Act to the Federal Bureau of Investigation and other federal law enforcement agencies for investigation. Convention participants will have the opportunity to file complaints directly with IACB representatives.

In 2002, the FTC launched a multi-media campaign with the IACB and Alaska State Council on the Arts involving the distribution of over 300,000 postcards and brochures through retail outlets, cruise ships, airlines and hotels, helping consumers to distinguish genuine Alaska Native arts and crafts from imitations. This year's convention attendees, artists and craftspeople, will benefit from the FTC's expertise in various consumer protection laws that prevent fraudulent, deceptive and unfair business practices in the marketplace, and will be provided a means to report possible violations.

The IACB will also present information from the Alaska State Council on the Arts promoting its Native Arts program, including the Silver Hand Program which authenticates Native arts and helps traditional Native artists promote their work. Advocating arts programs that reflect and sustain the cultural identities of the people of Alaska, the Silver Hand authentication program combats a pattern of cultural misrepresentation and misappropriation, and provides a valuable resource for economic development for Alaska Native artists and craftspeople.

Additionally, information will be made available from the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office that will offer technical assistance on the trademark process and how this may benefit artists and craftspeople in protecting their work through intellectual property rights. Through the registration of trademarks, the USPTO may assist small business owners in protecting their investments and promoting goods and services, as well as safeguarding consumers against confusion and deception in the marketplace.

For more information on these agencies and programs:

Indian Arts and Crafts Board/U.S. Department of the Interior
www.iacb.doi.gov; 888-ART-FAKE (888-278-3253)

Federal Trade Commission
www.ftc.gov; 877-FTC-HELP (877-382-4357)

Alaska State Council on the Arts
www.eed.state.ak.us/aksca; 888-278-7424

U.S. Patent and Trademark Office
www.uspto.gov; 800-786-9199


Media Contacts:

Meridith Stanton
Director, Indian Arts and Crafts Board
U.S. Department of the Interior
202-208-3773


Charles Harwood
Director, Northwest Region
Federal Trade Commission
206-220-6350



Consumers and Artists Can File Complaints Online about Falsely Labeled "Indian-Made" Products



Consumers can now file complaints about products falsely labeled as Indian-made on the U.S. Department of the Interior's Web Site. Complaints can be filed on the updated web page (www.doi.gov/iacb) of the Indian Arts and Crafts Board.

"To purchase authentic Indian arts and crafts, investigate the background of products," Secretary of the Interior Gale Norton said recently. "A seller with authentic goods will gladly provide information and a written guarantee that the work is Indian- or Native American-made."

The IACB, an agency located in the Interior Department, is in charge of enforcement of the Indian Arts and Crafts Act of 1990. The 1990 Act is a truth-in-advertising law that provides criminal and civil penalties for marketing products as "Indian-made" when such products are not made by Indians. Under the Act, an Indian is defined as a member of any federally or state- recognized Indian Tribe, or an individual certified as an Indian artisan by an Indian Tribe. It is illegal to offer or display for sale, or sell any art or craft product in a manner that falsely suggests it is Indian produced, an Indian product, or the product of a particular Indian or Indian Tribe or Indian arts and crafts organization, resident within the United States.

For a first time violation of the Act, an individual can face civil or criminal penalties up to a $250,000 fine or a 5-year prison term, or both. If a business violates the Act, it can face civil penalties or can be prosecuted and fined up to $1,000,000.

The IACB warns that consumer fraud not only harms the buyers, it also erodes the overall Indian arts and crafts market and the economic and cultural livelihood of Indian artists, craftspeople, and Tribes.

If you become aware of any market activity that you believe may be in violation of the Act, please contact the Indian Arts and Crafts Board either online at http://www.doi.gov/iacb/ or at 1-888-ART-FAKE.



Southern Plains Indian Museum Announces New Hours of Operation

U.S. Department of the Interior
Indian Arts and Crafts Board
Southern Plains Indian Museum
Announces New Hours of Operation


Beginning the month of May the Southern Plains Indian Museum will be open Tuesday through Saturday, 9:00a.m. - 5:00p.m, closed Sundays and Mondays.

The museum is located at:
715 East Central Blvd, Anadarko, Oklahoma.

For more information, please call (405) 247.6221.

 

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Indian Arts and Crafts Board
U.S. Department of Interior
1849 C. Street, N.W.
MS 2528-MIB
Washington, DC 20240
Telephone: (202) 208-3773
Toll Free: (888) ART-FAKE
Fax: (202) 208-5196
E-mail: iacb@ios.doi.gov
Director: Meridith Z. Stanton
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